Best Real Estate Schools in Texas

Need to get your Texas real estate license? You're in the right spot. In this guide, we've included everything you need to know about becoming getting your Texas Real Estate license - including the best schools you can attend to get your license.

Real Estate Express

Real Estate Express
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3.91/5

based on 35 reviews

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Real Estate Express Customer

I liked Real Estate Express because I was able to work at my own pace. I suggest CAREFULLY reading the information and definitely having good time management. When you do work on a chapter, be sure to finish it; otherwise, the work you complete will not be saved. There are a few issues with the curriculum, where it was hard to understand some sections that were a bit outdated. I do think they need to keep up to date with the state real estate commission so that users are not confused when it comes to testing.

RealEstateU

RealEstateU
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4.38/5

based on 24 reviews

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RealEstateU Customer

It was convenient, and the instructor was informative. If you want something very educational and easy to attend without having to go in person, I recommend it. I thought it was a good school, and I passed my exam the first time.

Champions School of Real Estate

Champions School of Real Estate
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4.77/5

based on 30 reviews

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Champions School of Real Estate Customer

I did my class at Allied, but went to Champions for test prep. The test prep was really good, and it helped me a lot.

The CE Shop

The CE Shop
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4.65/5

based on 20 reviews

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Noah D.

I liked it, especially the formatting and multiple choice. For anybody thinking of doing this course, make sure you're consistent and make time on your schedule to work on your courses. The price was affordable, and it was entertaining enough to stay engaged. I do recommend it.

360 Training

360 Training
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3.75/5

based on 16 reviews

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360 Training Customer

I liked that it was an online platform. Absolutely everything in the state and national exam was covered in their curriculum, I passed on the first try. I recommend that you stay focused and complete the whole program on a specific date. It was a great program.

Kaplan Real Estate Education

Kaplan Real Estate Education
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4.55/5

based on 11 reviews

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G.G.

I liked that I was able to get everything online and that it was user friendly. Everything was easy to access, and it was incredibly well informed. I'd definitely recommend this program, and I suggest to study all the material they provide, especially the book material. I thought the program was fun and entertaining overall. I felt very confident when it came to that state and national exam, especially after using outside material on YouTube for extra studying. They have excellent pricing, and I highly recommend it.

VanEd

VanEd
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4.33/5

based on 12 reviews

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Darius H

I liked that it was online and that I was able to do it at my own pace. My suggestion for VanEd is to keep up with the recent updates and provide more information that will be on the exams. My suggestion for future agents is just take your time and ask questions. Also, make sure you take prep classes, the one I took really helped me prepare and pass my exams.

McKissock Learning

McKissock Learning
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4.50/5

based on 4 reviews

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McKissock Learning Customer

The staff was extraordinary, and they always went the extra mile for their users. I thought the program was good, but it was a little dry. I think they should add videos to make it more interesting because reading throughout the curriculum was the worst. They also need to try to shorten the length of the information because there is way too much content, and users forget it by the end of reading everything.

Real Estate School FAQs

Before you can earn a Texas real estate license, you will have to meet the official requirements. You have to be 18 years or older, a Texas resident, a Permanent Resident, or a US citizen, and you have to meet the Texas Real Estate Commission’s integrity, trustworthiness and honesty standards.
To become a Texas real estate agent, you will have to undertake a Texas Real Estate Commission (TREC) background check. All of these are prerequisites with education to become a real estate agent in Texas.
Additionally, you have to have to meet these additional requirements

  • Complete 180 hours of pre-licensing education. Register for the required class and complete the mandatory 180 hours.
  • Secure a sponsoring broker. Before you can practice in the state, you have to be sponsored by a real estate broker with a Texas license.
  • Submit fees and forms to TREC. Once your 180 mandatory hours of licensing education have been completed, you can submit all necessary documents to TREC. You have the opportunity to select an inactive or active initial license. If you want to practice real estate, you’ll have to apply for the active license.
    Submit fingerprints. Schedule the fingerprinting and license examination. Once you get a letter of approval from the Texas Real Estate Commission, which directs you to the CIB or Candidate Information Brochure, you will be able to schedule an exam. You will also be able to submit for review your fingerprints. You typically have a year from the application date to pass the licensing exam.
  • Prepare for the state licensing exam. You must pay attention and study for the licensing test as this will be the final barrier to you becoming a real estate agent in Texas. Many students take a separate “test prep” course shortly before taking the state exam.
  • Take the State Exam. Once you have passed this exam and the necessary documentation and fingerprints are on record, you will be able to receive your Inactive or Active Salesperson License from the Texas Real Estate Commission by email.

Assuming you qualify for the requirements, earning a real estate license in Texas means you have to have completed 180 hours of accompanying real estate education. The courses below are required:

  • Principles of Real Estate I: 30-hour credit
  • Principles of Real Estate II: 30-hour credit
  • Law of Agency: 30-hour credit
  • Law of Contracts: 30-hour credit
  • Promulgated Contract Forms: 30-hour credit
  • Real Estate Finance: 30-hour credit

The state licensing exam isn’t too hard to pass, assuming you’ve taken a solid pre-licensing class and studied hard.  In Texas, a good number of people fail the test – but keep in mind that not everyone has taken a cram course to improve their odds of passing.

For anyone taking the Texas real estate licensing test, you will have 150 minutes to answer 110 questions.  The questions are all multiple choice and are split into two categories; the national section and the state section. 

The national section comes with 80 questions that have to be answered in the space of 105 minutes. The state section, on the other hand, comes with 30 questions that have to be answered within 45 minutes. 

If you happen to fall short at your first attempt at passing the real estate licensing test, Texas grants you three tries to pass both sections of the test. If you are unable to pass the two parts of the test after three attempts, you will have to take additional education, typically for 30-60 hours before you can retake the licensing test.

Becoming a real estate agent in Texas may seem like a daunting task due to the 180-hour education requirement.  However, this is a process that, if done diligently, can yield results in a short period. Real estate, compared to other industries, is one of the lowest barrier to entry fields you can join.  If you knock out the licensing education, find a supportive broker, and are willing to put in the effort, you could potentially earn six figures in this field. All of that considered – becoming an agent isn’t too hard, given the rewards.

Once you’re finished with the pre-licensing courses and you have passed the real estate exam to earn your license, you will be required to select a brokerage. This is because the state of Texas requires you to have an experienced broker direct and guide you in the first year through any concerns and questions you might have.  To select a broker, make sure you’re doing your research online about the best and worst parts about working there. Once you have a few frontrunners, double-check with TREC to see that they are licensed and approved.

To be a residential real estate agent in Texas, you do not need a college degree. If you choose to take an in-person approach to the course, it will most likely follow a semester schedule. This means that you can finish the course in just a couple of months. It is also possible for you to take the course online at your own pace, earning your hours in just a few weeks if you are willing to put in the hours.

Both commercial and residential real estate agents are required to be licensed by the state, but there are some differences. Both sets of real estate agents have to take the same classes and meet the same 180 hours requirement. A residential real estate agent does not have to have a university degree.

Below is a schedule of costs associated with becoming a realtor in Texas:

Pre-licensing education and training costs:

The estimated cost for this is around $400-$1000 or more depending on the school or online program you select. This involves finding an accredited and qualified real estate school to clock your hours. As stated earlier, the state of Texas requires you to finish 180 hours of education.

Real estate licensing and exam fees

This fee schedule is estimated to cost about $400. The breakdown of this schedule is as follows: applying for your license will incur a charge of about $50. You will also need to pay for your background check and mandatory fingerprinting. This typically costs around $100. TREC currently charges $54 per exam attempt. The license costs about $150.

Real estate broker fees

These fees are estimated to cost anything from $30 to $450 per month. The real estate broker fees are the fees that you have to incur when you want to become associated with a recognized and accredited broker. As it is your first year, there are some things that your sponsor broker will provide. These things, such as office supplies, photocopies, internet, and any other business expenses, are usually associated with the daily operation of your business. It is also likely that you will have to pay a desk fee every month to help reimburse some of these costs.

Real estate membership dues

Membership dues and feels usually cost around $200 or more each year. And while they can qualify as a tax break in the state of Texas, they are still a significant expense for many Realtors. This fee typically depends on how many associations you want to join. For instance, you can become part of your local and state real estate boards. Every one of these boards comes with a membership fee that has to be paid monthly or yearly for you to be able to enjoy the numerous advantages and networking options they offer. The local MLS or Multiple Listing Service will also have fees associated with them. Depending on where you are in the state, you may have to pay your monthly dues either to your broker or to the association directly.

Continuing Education

Becoming a real estate agent does not mean you stop educating yourself once you have passed your licensing tests.  To stay an active agent, you have to meet SAE and CE requirements. Some CE courses are offered for free through local boards of realty. Additional designations, though optional, may also come with fees.

No. Texas does not have reciprocity with any other state. If you are interested in becoming licensed in the state, you will have to meet every one of the current licensing requirements, regardless of if you have a real estate license from another state.

If you are searching for more information in regards to becoming a real estate agent in Texas, you can simply head to the website of the Texas Real Estate Commission: www.trec.texas.gov